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Old 01-14-2012, 11:18 PM   #1
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Default Moisture issues?

With the onset of winter I find lots of moisture build up in my living space. I am guessing a roof top hatch might solve this. My camper has two vents open year round covered by "vent max's" and it never has moisture problems. I hate to cut a hole in the 1/4 thick aluminum roof, but if that solves this problem, I may have to. Any suggestions?
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Old 01-15-2012, 11:12 AM   #2
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I'd put a couple roof vents in, with the rain covers. Or, you could probable put like a bathroom exhaust fan type setup in and then just vent it out the side or back. Then you would only have to cut a small round hole for the vent. As long as you have shore power you could put a timer wall switch in and have it cycle regularly to get the humidity out.
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Old 01-15-2012, 08:10 PM   #3
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I am thinking one of those fantastic breeze vents wih a rain cover. If I have to make a hole, might as well double as a ceiling fan.
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Old 01-16-2012, 09:41 PM   #4
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You have to control all the moister you can, squeegee the walls of the shower when finished
put damp clothes outside warm living qtrs? buy a small dehumidifier, heat with electricity rather than propane, vent the unit with fresh dry air... what is happening is the warm moist air is raising to the ceiling and condensating where the insulation is the thinnest.

The more you control moister to condensate, the easier it is to control moister build up at the ceiling and windows.
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Old 01-16-2012, 10:28 PM   #5
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I will let you know how it works out. I will stop at camping world next time I have national guard and pick a vent up.
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Old 01-16-2012, 10:58 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blizzardND View Post
You have to control all the moister you can, squeegee the walls of the shower when finished
put damp clothes outside warm living qtrs? buy a small dehumidifier, heat with electricity rather than propane, vent the unit with fresh dry air... what is happening is the warm moist air is raising to the ceiling and condensating where the insulation is the thinnest.

The more you control moister to condensate, the easier it is to control moister build up at the ceiling and windows.
I agree 100%. A motor home is no different than a house. Too many people try to address the visible moisture (simple condensation ... warm moist arm condensing on a cooler surface) when they should be trying to figure out where the moisture is coming from and eliminating it. Best way to get rid of the moisture, ventilate. That is the way a roof system in a house works. A significant byproduct of combustion (burning propane in a furnace, stove, or oven) is moisture. When its cold out, you need to get rid of it. When its 75 to 85 degrees out and the M/H is closed up, you probably don't have a problem. But as soon as you store it and the temp drops to 35, you'll have condensation and possibly mold and mildew.
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