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Old 07-06-2009, 08:45 AM   #1
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I am looking to buy a used conversion. I have looked at ads for units made by several manufacturers but it is difficult to determine quality. Did manufacturing methods change dramatically over time? How old is to old? I am looking to buy and use long term. Often needing to stay 4-5 days totally self contained mostly in Southeast.A/C huge. I have used 38-40 foot trational Class A RV's but they all have huge reliability problems. Trailer parks on wheels. Any suggestions welcome. Thanks.
George
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Old 07-06-2009, 01:39 PM   #2
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Welcome to truckconversion.net! I'm glad you're looking for a truck conversion. I don't know anything about the different construction methods so no help there. I think if you're looking at used units you would just want to make sure it's held up well. Take it for a drive and see how tight everything is. I don't know if a truck conversion is any less prone to problems than a "regular" motorhome tho? But, when they do break down, if it's a truck problem, you can pull into any truck repair place rather than a r.v. shop. Truck shops are cheaper and more plentiful. All of the other systems in a truck conversion are pretty much the same as any other motorhome so just as likely to break down.

Okay, Geofkaye will post soon about construction of the box methods and such.
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Old 07-06-2009, 09:48 PM   #3
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...gee thanks Bob86ZZ4!....just what I wanted to do tonight.....BUT since I was in the sun today....I need to go to bed early cuz I'm at it again tomorrow.......basically there are 2 different methods of building the box-one being FRP which is obsolete now and the old steel stud and siding method.....I only will use the steel stud and siding method as the FRP will de-laminate and bulge allowing water/vapor and air to get into the sandwich of fiberglass-wood and insulation which will in the end have to be repaired or the unite sold off at a reduced price.....with the stud and siding method any water that gets into the structure will leak out the bottom if insulated with foam board or fiberglass batt or even come out as water vapor if some holes are available for it to do so. I use spray polyisocinate foam-the voids are completely filled and no water will accumulate in the space as it is filled with insulation with a 7.0 "R" value per inch-there is no air movement[which accounts for 40% of heat loss] because the foam will expand into every crack and void-eliminating any air or water leakage.....simply put it is a more expensive method of insulating with longer term results that eliminate the moisture issue altogether...but as always-one gets what one pays for....more so in the RV industry than any aspect of the construction industry....more later when I've had my "....beauty rest" .... geofkaye
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Old 07-07-2009, 06:37 AM   #4
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How do you determine which method was used? What manufacturers did what?
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Old 07-07-2009, 07:41 AM   #5
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That's a good question. My rig has .060 aluminum skin on the outside, I know that much because I got a copy of the original build sheet and it shows the buyer upgraded from .030. Does that mean the walls are metal studs then?
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Old 07-07-2009, 05:53 PM   #6
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.... .60 ON THE OUTSIDE IS ABOUT THE TOP OF THE LINE....but if it is not a Showhauler and few other brands you might have a different arrangement ...I'd have to lift the interior corner to see for myself....OR you can contact the manufacture and ask...[it is easier and lot less time consuming].....I'd also ask for a reference to the build out, such as a brochure or a website with a video....without >1.5X1.5 steel tube that is welded in place and made part of the superstructure ya might have a problem....then again you might be lucky and have one of the first unites which were built a lot different....before they stated to cut corners and cheapen "lighten" the frame work....I'd make the call to United with the serial number handy and talk to them.....I have rebuilt a trailer with a steel frame SPF insulation and a 3/8" interior plywood sheeting....it was built like a tank and didn't even have flexing ripples{IMPOSSIBLE AS IT SEEMS}....geofkaye
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